Archives for category: Photographers

I am pre-selling my first monograph through Kickstarter:  Singular Beauty (Summer 2012) The book is being designed and published by Hans Gremmen, co-founder of Fw:, a platform for Dutch Contemporary Photography.

If you pre-buy the book through Kickstarter (for a pledge of  $45 +)  you will receive your book delivered before it is available to the general public. And every single person who supports Singular Beauty will have their name listed in the final publication. Read more about other rewards and the book on my project page.

Kickstarter is an ALL or NOTHING funding model and I only have until Jan. 20th, 2012 too make a big goal. I know things are tough out there for a lot of us, so whether you can spare $1, $5, $25, $45 or $500, every pledge helps!  There are rewards for every amount.

GET YOUR COPY NOW

If you feel comfortable, please share this link with anyone you think might be interested.

Become an Ultraviolet Beauty | March 3rd | 3-9pm

I am very excited to announce that AUREUS Contemporary will be showing my Ultraviolet Beauties work at Scope NY. They will be hosting an artist project in conjunction with Scope at the VIP preview of the fair on March 3rd. Please contact the gallery to set up your UV portrait commission:

In conjunction with the exhibition of Ultraviolet Beauties at our booth, Cara Philips will set up her UV studio and offer collectors the unique chance to get a commissioned Ultraviolet portrait of themselves or a loved one on SCOPE Opening Day. Portrait shots can be arranged directly on location at the photo studio in the SCOPE Lounge or at the Aureus Contemporary Booth (D14). This is an opportunity that will not be repeated again after the SCOPE fair. So please contact us to make arrangements for your portrait commission!

Here is part of the reason I have been MIA from blogging. My first solo show will run from August 17th – October 10th, 2009 at the Suffolk University Art Gallery. I hope those of you in the Boston area can make it to the opening on September 17th. Needless to say, I can’t wait to see the work on the wall in a finished installation.

Singular Beauty

Curated by James Hull

Suffolk University Art Museum at NESAD

Opening Reception September 17th, 6-8:30pm

75 Arlington St, Boston MA

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It was funny for me to read Joerg Colberg’s recent post on blogs,  I myself have had a half-hearted post about the state of blogs lingering as an unfinished draft for some time. But not surprisingly with my current life, I never got around to posting it. My general feeling about photo blogs has been a bit negative lately–that is not against other people’s blogs, but towards the overly insular and self-contained universe that it created. While I think some incredible things came out of it, and I have made some real friendships, ultimately it was not satisfying the true need I had to be more engaged in the photo process with my peers. In fact, it started to feel like an impediment to my own creative process. The amount of energy and time that was going into Ground Glass, was sucking me a little dry–leaving very little time or energy to make pictures.

However after my recent experience of having a meaningful, engaged dialog with my peers in person, I left re-energized and brimming with ideas. In a way, not blogging has helped me finally really edit of my Singular Beauty work, it gave me time to finish my book and actually start sending out my mock-up, and it gave me time to make room for a new project. So as much as I loved blogging, I realized for me right now, I had to choose. And paying my bills and my own photo work has to come first. Followed by Women in Photography. There is not a whole lot left over after that. I wish I could be super woman, but sadly I am not.

But at the Young Curators New Ideas, II opening, I got into a conversation with two woman who are still actively blogging. I will admit I was a bit negative about the entire “blogoshpere,” but the next day I got a google alert and went to PalmAire, (WIPNYC artist) Tema Stauffer’s blog and realized that is it me that is currently experiencing blog exhaustion. Both Tema, and Tethered’s, Elizabeth Fleming, have really engaging, personal and intelligent posts. And other blog’s, like Horses Think, and Nina Corvallo’s blog, and others, have continued to be really great reads. I think at the heart of the blog, is the personal voice. For me, blogs that stay like personal online diaries, and have an certain intimacy and that focus on sharing information about a subject they truly love, work best. When blogs move into the professional media territory, they start to lose a bit of soul.

Once blogs become “professionalized,” to me they are less interesting. The internet is the great equalizer, it is a place where major news organizations compete with small individuals for market share and audience. Something that was impossible when you had to pay to publishing costs.  So I understand the temptation to step up your game, but there are so many blogs now from the mainstream press, why not keep the individual blog more personal and less concerned with blog stats.  Unless you want to become a mainstream media outlet, with advertising etc. Which, by the way, I am not against.

Yet blogs like PalmAire and Horses Think, remind of what a valuable part of the photo community a blog can be–and perhaps now that my first solo show is close to being completely framed and delivered to the gallery, I will again be drawn back to share some of the amazing things that have happened in the last few months. But until then, there are a lot of wonderful voices out there, you just need to find the ones you care enough to listen to.

While I know I have been not blogging very much the last 3 or 4 months, I have been immersed in my own work, in Women in Photography and in my day job. While I miss you all very much and the blog community, I have had so many great things happening I have decided to be ok with letting the blog go a bit until I can redefine its next incarnation.

But just so you know how I am spending my time here are two of the things I am happily immersed in.  More soon on my own work….

The loss of Polaroid has been pretty devastating to many photographers, it has had a big effect on my UV work, and I am still trying to figure out how to do it without type 54 or 55.  So when they said they were doing a piece on the loss of Polaroid at work, I was immediately excited to do something.

We put together an online gallery of the incredibly varied work made by photographer’s who use the instant film. And we asked them to tell us why they chose to work with Polaroid or what made it special. This meant that I got to speak to Chuck Close and David Levinthal about working with the 20×24 camera and email with Philp Lorca di Corcia.  Suffice to say, it was a fantastic experience.  You can see the gallery and read the quotes now on newsweek.com.

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And today a new WIPNYC show went up with Lynne Cohen.  She has a new book out of all her color work, which is fantastic. This show is personally very exciting for me because Lynne is one of my favorite photographers.  I will never forget a few months into what would become Singular Beauty, my photo teacher Joel Sternfled, looked at my empty spa room and said, “I think you should look at Lynne Cohen.”  Of course after seeing her extraordinary work, I almost abandoned my entire project.  But after some time and thought, her work made me realize how important conceptual framework is to a body of work, and I also began to see how despite the similar subject matter, how very different our approach and ultimate goals were.

If you have a chance check out her show here.

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Lynne Cohen | Untitled (Submarines)


Tomorrow at Julie Saul Gallery

Brian Ulrich

5/28/09 6-8 pm opening reception

535 W 22nd St

saulgallery.com

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Klingman’s Furniture, 2008 © Brian Ulrich

And check out Salzburg-based photographer and blogger, Andrew Phelps‘s special edition pre-release of his new book:

NOT NIIGATA, 2009
28×28 cm, hardbound
ca 112 pages
ca 50 color images
ca 40,- Euro
Kehrer Verlag Heidelberg

You can contact him directly to purchase.  I have seen both the book dummy and the work, and it is a great edition to any photo library.

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© Andrew Phelps – from NOT NIIGATA, 2009

Panel Discussion at the New York Photo Festival

Brooklyn, New York

Artist-Publisher:
Mass Produced for Mass Dissemination
Panel Discussion

Thursday, May 14, 2009
5:00 pm

FREE with Festival Admission

New York Photo Festival
St. Ann’s Warehouse
38 Water Street
Brooklyn, New York
(718) 254-8779

The panel discussion series, Aperture Presents, premiers with acclaimed NYPH08 curator and Aperture publisher, Lesley A. Martin, moderating the discussion Artist-Publisher: Mass Produced for Mass Dissemination. Participants will include Jason Fulford and Leanne Shapton (J&L Books); Richard Renaldi (Charles Lane Press); and others to be announced.

Photographer Jacob Holdt Friday, May 15, at 3PM.

St Ann’s Warehouse.

We are pleased to announce the participation of the following artists in the ”New Documentations” Special Screening scheduled to take place on Saturday, May 16th at 8pm, in St. Ann’s Warehouse during the upcoming New York Photo Festival 2009.  Many of the artists will be in attendance and will participate in a Q&A immediately following the screening.  There will also be a panel discussion on Sunday, May 17th at 2pm, entitled ”New Documentations”, featuring many of the same artists.  Tickets required.

Participating Artists in the “New Documentations” Special Screening are:

Dawoud Bey

Jodie Bieber

Edward Burtynsky

Elinor Carucci

Lauren Greenfield

Robert Hornstra

Pieter Hugo

Ed Kashi

Gerd Ludwig

Joshua Lutz

Jehad Nga

Eugene Richards

Paul Shambroom

Alessandra Sanguinetti

Mikhael Subotsky

Donald Weber

A Special MediaStorm Presentation of “Driftless: Stories from Iowa” by Danny Wilcox-Frazier

and…

A Special Presentation by the W. Eugene Smith Fund

I am very excited to have work from my Singular Beauty series featured on Newsweek.com.  The photo gallery is accompanied by an essay that touches on my personal motivations for making the work.

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I meet Shane Lavalette at last year’s NY Photofest.  I was not only impressed with his knowledge of photography–I could not help but adore him–he is both genuine and intelligent.  So I was honored when he asked me to be a contributor to Lay Flat.  Of course I was even more flattered when I saw my list of fellow essayists.

One Credo After Another
by Tim Davis

Close Readings
by Darius Himes

The Secessionists Revisited: Artist Collectives in the Age of the Blog
by Cara Phillips

A Telephone Conversation with Mike Mandel
by Shane Lavalette

The Crisis of Experience
by Eric William Carroll

Castaways vs. Utopians
by Jason Fulford

Yesterday my copy came in the mail, and I was both impressed and inspired by what Shane has done. It is not only a great visual presentation, the essay’s are thoughtful and add to the current discussion about the nature and meaning of contemporary photography. Also, each essay offers a unique and different viewpoint.  I am even more excited to be a part of the project now that I have seen the final presentation.

I can’t wait to get some frames and create a LF installation piece for my apartment.  I know we are struggling these days, but Lay Flat is well worth it.

Purchase here and here.

Included Photographers:

Andreas Weinand, Anne Lass, Coley Brown, Debora Mittelstaedt, Ed Panar, Estelle Hanania, Gustav Almestål, Hiroyo Kaneko, Kamden Vencill, Mark McKnight, Michel Campeau, Nicolai Howalt & Trine Søndergaard, Nicola Kast, Nicholas Haggard, Shawn Records, Raimond Wouda, Richard Barnes, Thobias Fäldt, Whitney Hubbs and Yann Orhan.


Brian Ulrich had an excellent post recently on why photographers are not recording the the current economic crisis.  His post has generated 47 comments so far and it seems to have struck a nerve.  I find it interesting that on one hand there is a debate raging over whether we should incorporate unfolding current events into our work, and on the other, the Andrew Kreps Gallery current exhibition To Be Determined–focuses on work that deals directly with the medium of photography. While several of these artists I individually admire, collectively, at this moment, having a show about photography, does seem out of step.  Time Out New York said this:

The cerebral queries posed here spring from pioneering 20th-century photographers (Moholy-Nagy, James Welling, Richard Prince), but fail to break any new ground themselves. One has to hope that this current generation of photographers will ultimately choose to define itself by means other than a few tired lines of inquiry. What form those fresh ideas might take is clearly still, as the title of the exhibition suggests, to be determined.

Ouch!  This genre of work has been championed by Blind Spot, which coincidentally is hosting an event for this show this week.   In the last 5 to 7 years, this type of work has dominated–one name says it all–Roe Ethridge (however, the Soth-style {aka Sternfeld/Shore/Myerwitz} of portrait-scape has also been a force, but it has focused more on the set-up Crewdson stylistic version, which is also less content driven.)

In an age of cultural complacency, during which we elected GW twice, and few of us took to the streets to protest, Iraq, Guantanamo, the Patriot Act, or the dramatic and rapid disparity which expanded between the rich & the poor, work that doubles back on itself and shied away from engagement with the world made sense. But we are in a new era, and maybe Brian’s battle cry, which is being sounded by many major art critics in slightly different terms, has something to it.  As artists, it is our responsibility to be continuously questioning what makes a photograph art, especially in a world not only filled with copious amounts of commercial and amateur imagery but that is also overflowing with fine-art photography.  It is important I think at this moment to pause and question, what is more important–making a photograph that will be deemed “art” or making a photograph that can be powerful and that affect how people view the world.  Will post-post modernism mean that we can re-unite these concepts?

Many photographers currently worry about getting stuck in the “photo ghetto.”  Meaning once your work is represented by a photo gallery, you are stuck as ‘just a photographer.’  The insinuation being that you will be considered ‘less of an artist.’  Photography still hovers in a strange place in the art world.  If your work is photo-based, it is a good way to differentiate yourself from the rank & file.  However, if this is done merely as a way to get ahead in the art market, most likely the result will be all surface.  The best work centering on the photographic process, often incorporates multiples levels of engagement.  For instance Penelope Umbrico’s appropriation work , not only plays with authorship, it includes complex cultural critique, and an exploration of human desire.

With all this ruminating in my mind, I came across these photos on National Geographic.com of an 1908 National Geographic article on the survey of Alaska.  What I like about them, is that they remind me of the incredible power of the photograph to transcend its original purpose.  These images were taken to record a scientific exhibition, yet 100 years later, they could just as easily be a meditation on the landscape genre.  Grainy, muted and strange, they are quite beautiful.  Sometimes, perhaps we try so hard to imbue meaning and concept into our photographs that we actually close down this process, and in fact make them more empty.  There is a fine line between too much content and too much concept.

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Radcliffe Hordern

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Photographs by E. R. Martin



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Dorothea Lange | Shorpy photo archive

The art world is a-twitter with stories about the possible resurrection of the depression-era public arts project, the WPA.  The program resulted in some of America’s finest photography. However, according to the blog post below, some Congressman do not think “artist” is a job, and therefore they should not benefit from the stimulus package.

What I find so interesting is the the recent Holland Cotter NYtimes article accused the art world of being overly commercialized and seemed to suggest that “artist” had become too much of a job.  Hmmmm….. where does that actually leave us?  Maybe if there was support for artists, they would stop making over-produced commercialized work, designed to sell and you know, pay their rent.

From the blog: The Artful Manager

Do arts jobs count as jobs? Scott Lilly at the Center for American Progress floats a timely reminder to the good folks in Congress currently bristling about the stimulus package: arts jobs are jobs, regardless of your opinion of what they produce. He quotes Rep. Jack Kingston’s (R-GA) remarks when complaining about the NEA funding (now removed) from the bill:

“We have real people out of work right now and putting $50 million in the NEA and pretending that’s going to save jobs as opposed to putting $50 million in a road project is disingenuous.”

Which suggests, of course, that artists, cultural managers, stagehands, gallery staff, technicians, costume designers, and anybody else involved in artistic pursuits aren’t actually working, or earning a paycheck, or supporting their families, or any of the other productive things road workers might do. Or, to put it more bluntly, arts workers are not ”real people.”

It’s perfectly fair to challenge the ”stimulus potential” of any line item in the massive bill. And there are legitimate arguments to be made that one form of spending or incentive works more quickly, more effectively, more efficiently than another. But this particular line of attack, suggesting that the arts don’t involve people doing jobs, is staggering in its ignorance.

Before we go railing off on conservative politicians, however, we might look for the same bias and blindness among ourselves. I was at a conference panel recently, for example, in which an architect from a well-respected firm with extensive cultural facility projects to their credit made an astounding admission: up until their most recent project, that involved direct discussion with a wide range of practitioners, they hadn’t thought of a cultural facility as a workplace. A performance/display space, an audience chamber, and a public venue, to be sure. Even an administrative office tucked away in the back. But the entire building as a daily workplace for professionals and tradespeople? A novel idea.

Perhaps that explains why so many cultural facilities have spaces that can’t be cleaned, lightbulbs that can’t be changed without massive machinery, and offices and common spaces that cramp and confound the folks who come to work there every day. Somewhere between our lofty rhetoric about the power of the arts, and our mechanical arguments about social and civic benefits, there seems to be a disconnect in our message. The arts are people. They don’t just serve people or help people, they are people. It’s astounding that anyone would understand otherwise.

Today on my morning subway commute, I noticed some EMT workers walking past me with all their gear.  I did not pay too much attention, I was in a hurry to get to work, however as I got to the other end of the platform, I was met with the overpowering smell of bleach.  I looked down and discovered an MTA worker moping up a red substance.  It took my brain a split second to process that for the first time in my entire NYC subway travels, (10 years and counting,) I was seeing blood getting wiped away.

This this might not seem very dramatic to some,  NYC is a big city and certainly stuff does happen here – and in this particular occurrence, with no sign of police on the scene, I assume the blood was not the result of an act of violence. But it spooked me nonetheless, especially considering just last week on the same platform, I watched a man escape from the clutches of a transit cop, and handcuffed, jump down onto the R/W track and disappear.  He was soon  followed by about 10 bewildered looking cops.  The escape managed to shut down the entire N/S subway traffic for a good 20 minutes.  In my 10 years of subway riding I have seen some strange things, but in Giuliani & post-Giuliani NYC, this level of mayhem is rare. But I have noticed a chance since the collapse of Wall Street this fall, things are no longer just frayed around the edges, but starting unravel.

In the past 2 months, I personally have had several rather intense and fraught encounters.   And several people have told me stories, that have really made me question if we are on the verge of a collective breakdown.  One story, involved a person leaving an incredibly hostile, threatening phone call,  fueled by professional jealousy.  The anonymous caller felt the need to tell her, she was ugly and other choice expletives, which no matter how much you may dislike a person, are never appropriate to use.  Another friend had someone take the time to send them an email, basically just to tell them that they thought their photography sucked. This person did not even remove their name from the email.  Another person received an email that was an angry, three  paragraph tirade, and by anger, I mean personal, venomous, attack.  What is going on people!!!!!  When did this type of behavior become acceptable?  I cannot ever remember so many negative, random acts of hostility.  However, considering the current economic horror show, I am not surprised.

To me, one the first priority’s of the Obama administration should be to institute a qualified non-political commission to investigate the incredible malfeasance in Wall Street and in banking which has led to this global recession/depression. Because as much as we should focus on recovery, most people are suffering from feelings of incredible anger, and a sense that they are powerless to do anything about it.  When you read that the wives of  mega hedgefunds managers, CEO’s & investment bankers, are struggling to make do with their housekeepers coming 5 days a week instead of seven, or buying one pair of $700 Manolo’s, instead of three, it is hard to not want to burn down the whole of Greenwich, CT. Perhaps this is why so many people are acting out on strangers.  Someone must take the brunt of our collective anxiety, fear & anger.  Of course, these feelings are destructive and the exact opposite of what will help to lift us out of this economic disaster.  I think most of us, would feel a lot better, if we considered pooling our resources and supporting each other to survive this period of instability.

The art world has been particularly affected by the economic crisis.  One could easily argue, that when a roof over ones head & food on the table become issues, art tends to drop down on list of importance. But abandoning art and artists at this moment, could have a profound effect on how we interpret and think about this moment in culture. So now more than ever, it seems crucial that the art world pull together to make it through the storm.

On great example of this is the the Humble Arts Foundation. They just released their Collectors Guide, which they are in the process of distributing to the art industry and collectors.  (full disclosure my work is featured in the guide.) And while artists did pay a fee, once they were chosen to be included, it was modest, and was paid in two installments.  Humble footed almost the entire production bill themselves.  And by distributing the guide in the art world, they are giving every artist in the book incredible exposure.  Now, they very easily could have used the guide as a way to make money for the foundation, but they are choosing to use it as a tool to showcase artists, just like their group & solo shows do.

What impresses me most about this choice is that we are all in extremely difficult positions.  Gallery owners have incredible overhead to meet, artists have fewer outlets and opportunities, and non-profit’s donations are drying up.  So if there has ever been time to consider how we can work together, this is it.  If not, when this crisis is over, there will be dramatically fewer players left on the field.  Some may argue that this is a good thing, but keep in mind, that fewer galleries, museums and organizations mean fewer opportunities for artists.  And while yes, the art market has been over-hyped, over-saturated and over-indulged for sometime, leaving it to starve to death now, is no panacea.

So if you find yourself feeling like venting, take a few moments and consider what you could bring to the table rather than what you can knock off of it.


I don’t normally get emails from photographers asking me to look at or feature their work on GG. I imagine most of those emails go to Joerg, Shane, Mrs. Deane, Rob, or to one of the many curatorial projects, (because we certainly get a ton of them at wipnyc!)  But Today, my inbox contained a very straightforward and polite email from Simon Hoegsberg. If he is smart, which is my guess, he probably emailed some of the above and you will be seeing him elsewhere, but I was impressed enough with his project to give him a blog post.  While Beat Streuli, and Philip Lorca Dicorcia have made some great work in this vein, neither of them have moved quite so far into Gursky’s territory.  Simon’s giant portrait “We Are All Gonna Die – 100 Meters of Existence” in one of those cases where photo technology enhances what the artist is trying to accomplish, rather than just being a excuse to mess with photoshop.   The project has it’s own website, which I suggest you visit, as the piece cannot be properly shown on a blog.

I also quite like some of his NYC street portraits from “Tower of Babel”, his artist statement presents them with this caveat:  “In 2006 I quit the project because I realized I no longer believed in the idea behind it.”  I have to give me props for that alone.

Happy Inauguration Everyone!!!!!

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Today, Daniel Cooney’s Emerging Artist Series launches on iGavel. I happily ended up included in the auction after running into Daniel at the ACP portfolio review in Atlanta. There are some really nice pieces in the auction.  Reserves are only 200.00, so with the current market situation,  it is a great chance to pick up work at a very reasonable price.  There will another auction in December with another set of emerging artists.  The last day to bid for this auction is December 10th.

All the prints are available for viewing in person at:

Daniel Cooney Fine Art

511 W 25th St #506

www.danielcooneyfineart.com

212-255-8158

Some work in the auction:

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Noah Kalina, Untitled

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Avery McCarthy, There Are No Stars Here, XI

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Cara Phillips, UltraViolet Beauty #28

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Will Steacy, Father and Daughter, New Orleans, 2005


Miranda Lichtenstein – up now till October 20th.  Come take a look.

I had the great pleasure this weekend of attending the Blurb Photography Now awards and symposium to receive my award.  So I thought I would share some of the highlights. Thanks to everyone from Blurb who were so supportive and generous.  It was nice to see how genuinely invested all of their employees were in the contest.  I highly recommend the upcoming NYC symposium, especially if you are contemplating or creating a photo book. Darius Himes, from Radius Books, gave a thoughtful and very intelligent presentation on the history and importance of the photo book as a medium. Mr. Himes, also explained the criteria he created for the judges of the contest.  Not only was the quality of your photography a factor, but overall book design, the concpetual & emotional impact of the book, and the pacing and editing of the project.

There was an extremely informative presentation by Bob Aufuldish, a book designer from Aufuldish & Warinner, who went into great detail to explain the components that are used to design a photo book.  For a photographer, it is great to hear the ways in which design choice can help to elucidate your conceptual framework.  He showed various books as examples of successful design, including Lewis Baltz, The new Industrial Parks, near Irvine California, Robert Adams, The New West , and Edward Steichen, The Family of Man. I know I am already inspired to take my book to the next level.

Also very exciting, Michelle Dunn Marsh, formally of Aperture West, now a senior editor at Chronicle Books, showed the soon to be published Aperture West Prize winner, Hank Willis Thomas‘s book.  It is a truly inspiring piece of work. Thomas’s varied formal strategies are all intelligently incorporated under a unifying theme.  What was great to hear, is that Marsh had followed Willis Thomas’s career for some time but felt unsure of how to publish it, before he resubmitted his work for Aperture West Prize with a new artist statement.  She said that his shift to from a personal interpretation to a broader cultural theme, placed the work in a different context, which to her elevated the work and made it important to print. I think it is easy to be discouraged or worry that you must get everything right at the first go, so I love to hear that your work can evolve as it lives in the world. What is not quite right one day can suddenly comes into focus.

Which leads to another very interesting discussion at the event, the impact of self-publishing on your chances of getting published by one of the major houses.  This is obviously a “developing field” and the impact is still in transition.  What clearly emerged, is that limiting your book editions, and being open to changing your book and to collaborating with a publisher, greatly improve your chances.  Of course for every rule there is an exception, but it does make sense to me that a publisher would be wary of investing $50,000 is something that has already been released. Although I think as time passes this may change.

Other presenters included, Elisa Urbanelli, senior editor at Abrams, Clare Jacobson from PA Press, and photographers Todd Hido & Dan Milnor.  Perhaps the strongest theme I took away from the symposium, is the importance of research.  Find out what publishers are right for you before submitting, and create a book project that has lasting power. The pro publishing world is working 2 years in advance, so they must consider how relevant your work will be in 2010.  As an artist, it is hard to think that way, but clearly good work only improves and becomes more relevant as time passes.

Another useful tidbit was the importance of following up and keeping in touch.  Again, no’s can become yes’s as factors change.  So if someone says to keep in touch, according to Dunn Marsh, that means do it!  You may not hear back, but if they are interested in your work, they do pay attention.  While it is hard not to give up when you get no response, in the long run it does not help you to be easily discouraged.

The Blurb event is on the road, it is in Cologne now, and will continue on to London 10/10, and then comes here to NY 10/22.

Cologne

Photokina

10/23/08 – 10/28/08

Koelnmesse

Messeplatz 1
50679 Köln

Hall / Stand: 10.2: C042

London

Friday, October 10, 2008
1:30-5:30 pm
RSVP Now
Delfina Galleries
50 Bermondsey Street,
London SE1 3UD
+44 20 7564 2400
Map

New York

Wednesday, October 22, 2008
2:30-6:30 pm
RSVP Now

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002
212.219.1222

Why sometimes computers & outsourcing fail.  I apologize to all of you incredibly generous people who sent me donations for my AIOP outdoor photo project, now formally scheduled for October 18 & 19 in Union Square, and October 24 & 25 at 14th St and 9th Ave in the meatpacking district from 11-2 & 2-4 each day, weather depending.  There is also an opening party for the event on 10/5 and lots of other exciting stuff going on all month, I will post a map of the activities soon.

However paypal, partly because of my not understanding how to request money correctly, but mostly because of the two customer service agents from India were unable to comprehend or correctly help me with the issue, all of your funds were returned. Today I finally got someone on the phone who explained to me how all of my difficulty could have easily been avoided.  So I am up for round #2 if you are all, I have sent emails to you re-requesting the funds. It is quite embarrassing to be sure!  But, I am even more excited about the project itself, despite the paypal debacle, especially now that the work will be featured in two group shows this fall.

The first one at Michael Mazzeo Gallery, formally Peer Gallery, opens next Friday, the 12th.  I know it’s a crazy season but I hope those of you in the NYC area can stop by.  Some great photogs are also in the show, including the indomitable Will Steacy and Miss Rachael Dunville.  I met Michael at a portfolio review, and have kept in gentle contact since. Part of what makes this show so exciting for me, is that all my hard work and energy has led to being in a group show at his gallery.  It is so important to develop and maintain relationships, no matter what field you are in. Developing them takes enormous amounts of time, energy, and a willingness to accept that it often leads to nothing.  But if you are patient and persistent, and if your work has any value, things do happen.  During my month off, I thought a great deal about where I want to go next, and now that things are happening, I am energized to pursue those ideas. So I hope to see you all on the 12th!

Michael Mazzeo Gallery

How I Spent My Summer Vacation

September 12 – October 11
Opening Reception
Friday, September 12, 6 PM – 8 PM

526 W 26th St Ste #209

And don’t miss this week’s big opening for me, Joel Sternfeld’s the Oxbow Archive. From the Press Release:

Sternfeld’s new work represents a break with painterly notions of the Picturesque and the Sublime; his field is flat, average and indistinguishable from thousands like it. He does not take the view from nearby Mount Holyoke as the Hudson River School painter Thomas Cole did in 1833 and look down on the Oxbow of the Connecticut River, the “grandest prospect in North America.” A single field that appears in Cole’s now iconic painting is of ample interest for Sternfeld’s attentive eye.

This work represents a departure from archetypal photographic depictions of nature; grandiloquent mountain views and dramatized skies are eschewed, as are ideal specimens of flora. Anthropomorphization of “perfect form in nature” does not occur; the geometric is not valorized. The photographs are not meant to be metaphoric equivalents of anything else. Rather, the images present themselves without pretense as a systematic index of seasonal progression.

If you know Joel, you know that is probably the most personal project of his life. It is a very subtle and intellectual body of work and a departure from his oeuvre in some ways. But I give him enormous credit, for his willingness to continue to grow and take risks as an artist, instead of churning out show after show of the same work, guaranteed to make $$, or to live off his glory days and just keep endlessly having retrospectives.  I am not naming any names of other photographers of his caliber, but I think you all know who I mean.  When you have a certain level of success and still have the balls to fall flat on your face, or to make work that needs to age to have meaning, is a rarity in today’s art world.  But if we want to have anything to look at in two hundred years of any value, we need artists wiling to do just those things.

Luhring Augustine

Joel Sternfeld

Oxbow Archive

Sep 6 – Oct 4 2008

531 W 24th St

Today I was checking the stats for Women in Photography, I always find it fascinating to see how many sites around the world pick up the shows and write about them. I assume they say good things since I can’t read the many different languages we have been featured in.  Today, I saw Aperture.org and clicked on the link. And there in black and white on the Aperture website is the write-up for the Women in Photography Panel in September!  I can’t tell you how wonderful it feels see my name on the Aperture site and to be in such illustrious company. Truly, it is honor to speaking at an institution that once seemed so far out of reach. Thanks Laurel!  I hope you all can come to out talk, and help us make it a success.

New York, New York

Women In Photography
Spotlight

Tuesday, September 30, 2008
6:30 p.m.

Aperture Gallery
547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor
New York, New York
(212) 505-5555

I recently discovered Vincent Laforet’s blog via the Jackanory, I know I am a few weeks behind the curve, I have found myself unable to motivate myself to do much more than read, go for walks and eat in the midst of such beautiful surroundings and weather.  But I did take a peek over the weekend, to see if I had missed anything.  I have been thinking quite a bit about blogging up here, strange how as you remove yourself from something your feelings and perceptions change.  When Shoot the Blog launched, I understood that the photo blog would inevitably be co-opted by mainstream media outlets. However Rachel Hulin has managed to maintain a relatively corporate free attitude and I never read it and think “this is an ad for Photoshelter.” A very smart decision by them and to Rachel’s credit.

However, when I clicked on the first Olympic photo on Laforet’s blog and was taken to the Newsweek site, I knew that something had shifted.  Laforet’s blog is absolutely a commercial endeavor, and it is backed a major media corporation, even if they are not paying for it (as most blog hosting companies are free).  When you click on the images and texts on his blog, they are hyper-linked directly to the Newsweek blog. The sites exist both as the Newsweek blog about their assigned photographer at the Olympics and as the blog by a Newsweek assigned photographer at the Olympics. Confused yet?  There is definitely something really interesting about Newsweek site, it is rare that a major news magazine lets a photographer write about his experiences. It is a very successful addition to their website, and similar to the NY Times blogs, it functions as a place online to feature mini stories.

Laforet’s blog in contrast, is a miss. Part of why the blog disappointment to me, is that I have always found his work to be the most visually interesting and whimsical of the NY Times photographers.  So, I want to see the pictures Newsweek doesn’t pick. The ones that are too racy, too weird for publication. Or his favorites, or the ones he thinks failed and why. I already know that Vincent Laforet is an amazing, successful and talented photographer and I know he has to protect his status, but why start a blog to just show images that are already so accessible in other venues. On the Newsweek blog, he is giving us an edited and professionally produced “inside view” of a super successful magazine photographer, which in that context works very well.  But in the context of the personal artist blog, it functions like an infomercial for him. I think this raises some very interesting issues about the nature of the photo blog. So far, the most successful blogs, have either been very personal in nature or curatorial.

My fear is that big companies will see blogs succeeding and will jump on the bandwagon to create what they deem as safe replicas of the blog genre.  I think there should is a definite line between a blog sponsored by a major media conglomerate and the blog of an individual artist.  When the two are blurred, something is lost. Even though I know the change cannot be stopped, to me the blog should remain the wild west. A place where artists can meet, share information, show their work, and connect with the world around them. If that helps their career, great, but please leave the unremitting self-promotion for your website, or for dinner parties.


WIPNYC Presents Erika Larsen up today.

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